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20121004
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at the marginal rate in the united states, when ronald reagan took office, the marginal office with 71% to 72%. it is interesting to me that the greatness that people speak of in terms of the united states, when we talk about the 1940's, the 1950's, the 1960's, 1970's, the marginal rate that folks paid was much greater. nobody says we will go back to that. at the same time, during the clinton years, we had marginal rates that were a little bit higher than they are now and we had some of the best economic times that the country has ever seen. that is what i'm talking about. my concern for the country is that all of this heat has been generated around this issue instead of light and analysis and a sober look at the role that every american play, should play in strengthening our country. that is the concern i have in the long run. >> i want to pick up mr. cruz's suggestion that the economy is in trouble from -- is in trouble. texas has endured. but san antonio has had a tough couple of years. the census bureau report brought these numbers appeared between 2009 and 2011, unemployment in san anton
with each other. >> do you recall anyone saying after ronald reagan said, there you go again, whether that was spontaneous? program? we only know it was devastating. he probably forgot what he was talking about when he said it. >> this is the proper time to remind everyone about how to ask us a question if you are tweeting -- it is #ncadebates12. we will be looking for those questions. and there will be forwarding those questions up here. for those of you who want to ask a question in the studio. we have been sitting in the viewers' chair. let us put ourselves, to some degree, behind the podium. and talk about the format. a few of you touched on the format. we have this town hall in the middle of the three presidential debates. how important is that format? and for each of you again, which format would you prefer? one of the two we are going to have this year, or the third one? let us go to the panel and said, format is important, i guess, which one do you prefer? let us start in the middle. >> and never entered your original question. i can probably do that here about is not being re
or ronald reagan or bill clinton? do they approached these debates differently or do the american people view it differently when you have a sitting president? >> i think so, yes. one of the things that happens is the incumbent is at somewhat of a disadvantage being placed on an equal footing as the challenger, as we talked about before. incumbents have typically had a very rough time in the first debate. i am thinking back to jimmy carter in 1980. ronald reagan in 1984. george h. w. bush in '92. all of these guys who had been in the presidency, they got on that debate stage and came face-to-face with the challenger. it is rattling. they all had a very difficult time getting through the first debate. in each case, they had to up their game as the series went forward. >> you say, "the morning after the debate, will the media the talking about knockout punches? who knows? a little boldness might make good politics." what do you mean? >> i mean this idea of not approaching this debate as an awful obstacle you have to get over but taking advantage of that opportunity. even for the guys like
as a college cartoonist. i sank my teeth on that ronald reagan. that was like having george did the bush in office, because ronald reagan would say crazy stuff. i kind of miss ronald reagan for different reasons than you guys miss him. [laughter] >> we have a question in the front row. >> i am curious. you said you are sometimes considered too political. what does that mean? >> i was speaking in terms of a daily comic strip. we have the issue where if you have a political comic strip, either people will segregate it in another section or the opinion page. i got a great spot right under doonesbury. i am the second strip. just being a latino and being a minority cartoonist, there are not that many of us. almost anything i would say could be considered too political. people just want me to shut up. >> i do a political comic strip, too. you may consider yourself a minority, but i am a french with iranian cartoonist. -- lithuanian cartoonist. >> it is amazing a french person would challenge him. but i want to talk about your comic strips also. lotit came as a reaction to l to croce. i was liv
to be there and are eager to make their case. bill clinton was like that. ronald reagan was like that. these two are not like that. for them, this is more, please do not let me do anything wrong, than, what can i do right? as was discussed earlier, he needs a dramatic moment to shift the momentum. if he is intimidated by the experience or feeling boxed in, he is less likely to do that. for obama, it is more a question for maintaining his lead. he does not want to do anything right now that reverses the trajectory he is on. i would expect he is a literate -- a little timid as well. >> if you look at past debates, one dealing with policy, the d, the with gerald forwar other is more style, where obama made a joke about his age. how much is policy and how much a style in these debates? >> i think probably my judgment would be a lot of the stylistic -- a lot of it is stylistic. it is the way they come across to the voters. it is not necessarily as much what they are saying as how they are saying it. every once in awhile, it is itchly more of a case of glti avoidance. to do with lot with their handler
worked with those in the congress. we had the grand compromise with ronald reagan and tip o'neill. it did increase incrementally the age of retirement. and the major factor in attempting to try to keep the social security system reliable, that has actually worked for the last quarter of a century. but will we have the courage now to reach across the island talk about those things. it makes it very difficult to have your opponent and his supporters criticize you because you voted to raise the social security age back in 1983. i thought that is what they talked about, the great times of tip o'neill and ronald reagan working together across the aisle. i worked across the aisle. we stabilize the situation appeared and now he criticizes it. how does that it is anywhere closer to solving the problem? one of things -- one of the things that we have to do is make sure that people who are 55 and over are not affected. >> what about his accusation that you want to privatize social security? >> that is untrue. i suggested a portion of what you're particular account to be invested you see fit. here i
Search Results 0 to 7 of about 8 (some duplicates have been removed)

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